One thing you’ll notice in every one of parks is we use a great deal of rope.

Rope to wrap huge structural posts in South Padre and Corpus Christi.

Rope on pilar

See the rope behind Schatze and our head of the Shrimp Haus and Foods in South Padre, David? That’s from a ship! (We have been dying to use this picture)

Rope to designate pathways in New Braunfels, Galveston, and Kansas City.

path rope

Once on a ship, now in our park!

Rope to theme up an eatery or shade structure.

shade rope

Ropes can give a festive air, given half a chance.

 

 

What you may not  know is those ropes are on what  we like to call their “encore” career. Most of the very large ropes (typically an inch or even three in diameter) was once part of a ship’s equipment.

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Swim up bar in Corpus Christi

 

Modern ship rope is manufactured using synthetic fibers like nylon and polyester. Yet every day ships are decommissioned with huge amounts of rope that still have plenty of life left in them.

boat o' rope

We have, literally, boatloads of rope.

It’s not the only way we use decommissioned ships at Schlitterbahn, but one that saves room in landfills, reduces the production of synthetic fibers, and is a way to tread a little lighter on the earth as we continue to grow.

It’s a reflection of our commitment to sustainability in our building and operating practices. And it’s something we think more companies are beginning to think about.